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Archive for April, 2008

30 April
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Library of Congress Digitized History

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Alex notes on History Rhymes that you can browse through a great selection of digitized material on the Library of Congress website.

…quite an extensive selection of primary materials: both digitally reproduced (i.e. typed out on the website in easy-to-read format) as well as scans of the originals.

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29 April
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Has Alexander’s Shield Been Found?

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Archeologists say an ancient Greek tomb thought to belong to Alexander the Great’s father is actually that of Alexander’s half brother. Recent studies show that the artifacts found in the tomb are a generation more recent than previously thought, said Eugene N. Borza, professor emeritus of ancient history at Pennsylvania State University. Archeologists say the iron helmet, ceremonial shield and silver crown belonged to Alexander the Great himself but were then claimed by his half brother after his death. via World History Blog.

Read the original article here.

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28 April
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Putting Your Life in the Hands of History

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Olivier Vietti-Teppa (Swiss daredevil), 36, jumped using a parachute based on sketches made by Da Vinci  in 1485.

He said after the jump in Payerne, near Geneva: “It worked perfectly. I was unable to steer it, but I just glided gracefully to the ground.

Read the whole article here.

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25 April
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WWI Cookies

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Sometimes Twitter totally rocks!

This from none other than Leo Laporte:

leolaporte Happy ANZAC Day. Now give me a bikkie! http://snipurl.com/25uos

Trivia for you…. What was WWI called before WWII?

Answer: The Great War

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25 April
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New York City History

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The Bowery Boys have a very specific history related podcast. All the subjects they talk about have something to do with New York City. Today they covered Riker’s Island, the famous prison island in New York.

What do Salvador Dali, John Jacob Astor, Peter Stuyvesant, the Civil War, and a big pile of trash have to do with the world’s biggest penal colony? We connect the dots in this history of Rikers Island.

Listen to the episode at their website The Bowery Boys | New York City History

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24 April
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History of Earth Day

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Earth Day is, without a doubt, the youngest holiday that’s so widely accepted. The term hadn’t even been invented until 1969, when it was announced there was going to be one in 1970.

A creation of Senator Gaylord Nelson, it was designed to become a grassroots movement that would highlight the needs of the planet.

Read the rest of this article at:  Environmental Graffiti

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23 April
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Catherine and Peter: The Odd Couple

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Russia’s Catherine the Great looks on whilst husband Peter plays with toy soldiers….

Peter was a young barbarian with the manners of an unlicked cub… he was of a temper alternately violent and sulky, addicted to practical jokes in a society of ladies, spent most of his time in playing at soldiers with his valets, and a good deal of the rest of it playing with dolls and toys.

Extremely interesting read on the life and times of Catherine the Great and Peter.  You can find the rest of this article at History House.

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22 April
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Baseball History

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Step in the way back machine with me to read about baseball’s first World Series Hero Deacon Phillippi…

Baseball pitcher Charles Louis (“Deacon”) Phillippi, of Rural Retreat VA, was drafted into the National League by Louisville in 1898, and began his baseball career with that team on April 21, 1899. On May 29, 1899 he pitched a no-hitter against the Giants in only his seventh major league game. In 1900, he moved to the Pittsburgh Pirates, where he spent the rest of his baseball career, through his final game on August 13, 1911.

Read the rest of this article at Appalachian History: Stories, quotes and anecdotes.

Want more baseball history?  Check out: Baseball History Podcast

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21 April
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China’s Terracotta Army

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China’s terracotta army… was entirely covered with beaten egg when it was constructed, according to German and Italian chemists who have analyzed samples from several of the figurines.  According to the research team, the egg served as a binder for colorful paints, which went over a layer of lacquer.

Read the whole article at Discovery News..Want to see the terracotta army, but can’t get to China?  Well, you may be in luck because:

Museum of the Terracotta Army and Horses and the Cultural Relics Bureau of Shaanxi Province in Xi’an, China will be on display stateside at the following venues:

  • Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, Santa Ana, CA, USA (May 18-October 12, 2008);
  • High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA, USA (November 15, 2008-April 26, 2009);
  • Houston Museum of Natural Science, TX, USA (May 18-September 25, 2009); and
  • National Geographic Museum, Washington, D.C., USA (November 19, 2009-March 31, 2010)

via Suite101.com

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18 April
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On This Day: London Bridge sold to an American

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London Bridge 3

On 18 April 1968, the bridge was sold to the American entrepreneur Robert P. McCulloch of McCulloch Oil for US$2,460,000.

London Bridge 1

As the bridge was disassembled, each piece was numbered to aid reassembly and those markings can still be seen today. The bridge was reconstructed at Lake Havasu City, Arizona and re-dedicated on October 10, 1971. The reconstruction of Rennie’s London Bridge spans a man-made canal that leads from Lake Havasu to Thomson Bay, and forms the centerpiece of a theme park in English style, complete with mock-Tudor shopping mall. Rennie’s London Bridge has become Arizona’s second-biggest tourist attraction, after the Grand Canyon.London Bridge 2

The version of London Bridge that was rebuilt at Lake Havasu consists of a concrete frame with stones from the Old London Bridge used as cladding. Not all of the bridge was transported to America, as some was kept behind in lieu of tax duties. The remaining stone was left at Merrivale Quarry on Dartmoor in Devon, so a large part of Rennie’s bridge never left the UK. When Merrivale Quarry was abandoned and flooded in 2003, some of the remaining stones were sold in an online auction.

I grabbed the above from Wikipedia. Read the rest here. The images are from The Library of Congress.

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