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Archive for May, 2008

29 May
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Shakespeare’s grave makeover

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The grave of William Shakespeare in Stratford-upon-Avon is due to be revamped as the church where he is buried gets restored

Thanks to HNN for the link.  Direct link to the video at BBC.

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28 May
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OC Podcasters Meetup in Two Weeks

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Join me and other podcasters as we meet to discuss podcasting and new media in Orange County Wednesday, June 11th at 6:30pm.  Mark your calendars!  For more information check out the meetup group or ocpodcasters.com.

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27 May
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Have they found Cleopatra?

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According to the Women of History blog archaeologist are hot on the trail of Cleopatra..

About a month ago, it was reported that Egyptian archaeologist, Zahi Hawass was close to locating the final resting place of Cleopatra and Marc Antony

Hawass has discovered a 400-foot tunnel beneath the temple containing clues that the supposedly beautiful queen may lie beneath. “We’ve found tunnels with statues of Cleopatra and many coins bearing her face, things you wouldn’t expect in a typical temple,” he said.”

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23 May
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HP113 – Roman Aqueducts

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This is a guest podcast from Michelle all about the aqueducts in Rome.  I hope you enjoy it.  Please leave your comments at the bottom of this post.  Thank you.

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22 May
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Three Blogs to Check Out Today

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I could not decide which blog post I wanted to feature today, so I’m going to post all of them and you the reader can decide:

First Dinosaur Footprints Found on Arabian Peninsula from History Buff

In ancient coastal mudflats in Yemen, fossils reveal that a herd of 11 gigantic dinosaurs — sauropods, the largest animals that ever walked on land — tramped deep tracks into the earth that have lasted roughly 150 million years.

Ireland History from irelandhistory.org

I have receieved many requests for more Irish history.  Well, for those who are not getting enough Irish history from podcast check out this site!

Japanese tea ceremony from Japan History and Culture

A wonderful and very detailed description of the ceremony and its meaning.

The Japanese tea ceremony (chanoyu, lit. “tea hot-water”; also called chad? or sad?, “the way of tea”) is a multifaceted traditional activity based on Taoism (Daoism) and influenced by Zen Buddhism, in which powdered green tea, or matcha , is ceremonially prepared and served to others.

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21 May
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The Homestead Act of 1862

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The Homestead Act of 1862 was designed to encourage people to settle the west. By the time the act was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on May 20, 1862, eleven southern states had already succeeded from the Union and almost a century of debate about how best to go about settling unsettled land in the west had already passed. The Homestead Act was a culmination of the triumphs and failures of the past one hundred years of experimentation.

This is a great article post by Alex.  Very detailed and very interesting.  Definitely worth a visit to  History Rhymes to check out this post and previous ones.  I’m bookmarking this blog!

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20 May
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The French and Indian War: Wolfe’s capture of Quebec 1759

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Here is a wonderful article on the French and Indian war.

In 1759 thirty-two year English General James Wolfe successfully defeated the French General Montcalm. Quebec, France’s chief city in Canada was taken, radically altering the balance of power in North America. With the Seven Year’s war raging in Europe (known as the French and Indian war in the American colonies) and British command of the oceans, French possessions were vulnerable to British attack. Quebec itself sits on a rocky headland that rises hundreds of feet above the confluence of the St.Lawrence and St.Charles rivers. These formidable natural defences combined with a French garrison of 14,000 troops and 106 guns made the city one of the strongest fortified positions on the entire continent.

You can read the whole article at Military History and Warfare Blog.

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19 May
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Today in History

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On May 19, 1935 British author and soldier, TE Lawrence, also known as “Lawrence of Arabia,” died from injuries sustained in a motorcycle crash.  You can learn more about Lawrence’s life by listening to Episode 7 here.

More links for your web browsing enjoyment:

http://telawrence.info/telawrenceinfo/index.htm

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/lawrence.htm

http://www.pbs.org/lawrenceofarabia/ 

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16 May
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Did El Niño Help Magellan Out?

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In the article Magellan’s Secret Weapon: El Nino? by Randolph E. Schmid of the Associated Press the question of whether El Niño helped Magellan in his journey is discussed.  Did this famous explorer have help from Mother Nature on his journey?

The El Niño phenomenon that has puzzled climate scientists in recent decades may have assisted the first trip around the world nearly 500 years ago. … While the actual reasons for Magellan’s choice of route remain uncertain, El Niño conditions “may have been largely responsible for structuring the route and extent of what many consider the world’s greatest voyage,” the researchers wrote.

Read the rest of the article by clicking on the link above.

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15 May
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Bust of Aging Caesar Found in Rhone River

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 Interesting  article posted at Discovery News yesterday…

Divers trained in archeology discovered a marble bust of an aging Caesar in the Rhone River that France’s Culture Ministry said Tuesday could be the oldest known.

Read the rest of this article at Discovery News.

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