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Archive for May, 2008

14 May
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OC Podcasters Meetup Tonight

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If you have ever wondered about podcasting and want to know more, come meet the experts (that’s everyone but me at these things). We will be meeting tonight at 6:30pm in Orange County. Visit OC Podcasters or join the Meetup group at meetup.com for free for more information, including directions to the meetup and a list of those who have RSVP’d. Hope you can make it.

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13 May
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Queen Mary…No the Other One

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Great post on Women of History…

No, not Queen Mary I of England, nor the ship of the same name, but Queen Mary of Hungary.

Read about how they hope to find the Queens belongings in the Danube at the Women of History blog.

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12 May
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Science History: Celsius

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Good monday morning to you.  How about some Scientific history?

The Celsius scale is widely known as the centigrade scale because it is divided into 100 degrees. It is named for the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius, who established the scale in 1742.

Read more about Mr. Celsius at History of Science blog.

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09 May
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Iroquois Women

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Great post over at History of American Women.  Very detailed.  Maggiemac, the author,  should podcast.  Here is a little snip of the article.  Visit History of American Women to read the rest.

The Iroquois were one of the most powerful Indian races, controlling land all the way down the eastern seaboard of North America and several hundred miles inland. A woman’s place in Iroquois culture was very different from that in European cultures. Iroquois women enjoyed social equality and respect that was not shared by colonial American women.

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08 May
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13 Things About the Zoot Suit Riots

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Remember Zoot Suits? No, me either, but their still cool…

1. Zoot suits were popular among Hispanics, African Americans, and Italians during the 1930s and 1940s.

2. They were mainly worn for special occasions. The suit consisted of high-waisted, wide-legged, tight-cuffed pants paired with a long coat called a carlango that sported wide lapels and high padded shoulders. Sometimes a hat completed the look that contained a long feather. Sometimes a watch chain dangled from the belt to the knees and then looped back to a side pocket.

Read the next 11 at History is Elementary

Still want more? The Bowery Boys have got you with another edition of New York City history. This time its the Old St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

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07 May
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Today in History: Lusitania sunk

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May 7, 1915 – The British ocean liner Lusitania was sunk by a German submarine in World War I off the coast of Ireland.

Lusitania met a disastrous end as a casualty of the First World War when she was torpedoed by the German submarine, U-20, on May 7, 1915. Carrying many American passengers, the great ship sank in just 18 minutes, eight miles (15 km) off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland, killing 1,198 of the people aboard. The sinking turned public opinion in many countries against Germany. It is often considered by historians to be the second most famous civilian passenger liner disaster after the sinking of the Titanic.

Read more about the sinking of the Lusitania on Wikipedia.

More links for your web browsing enjoyment:

PBS Online – Lost Liners – Lusitania

Great Ships

Lostliners.com

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06 May
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History of Cinco de Mayo

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My guess is a lot of people don’t really know why people celebrate Cinco de Mayo.  I didn’t know what it was a celebration of until this year.  I was curious and looked it up.  Here is what I found out… 

The holiday commemorates an initial victory of Mexican forces led by General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín over French forces in the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862.

The Battle of Puebla took place on May 5, 1862 near the city of Puebla during the French intervention in Mexico. The battle ended in a victory for the Mexican Army against the French occupational forces. The victory is celebrated today during the festivities of Cinco de Mayo (5th of May). In the United States, a common misconception is that Cinco de Mayo is Mexico’s independence day.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Puebla.

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05 May
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Today in Music History

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Check out what happened on this day in music history with Brian Ibbot.  I thought it would be cool if you could all listen to today’s posting.  So head on over to Today in Music History and learn something!

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04 May
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HP112 – Battle of the Aleutian Islands

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This is a request from Andrew Turnier. I hope you enjoy listening to this podcast. Much more to this post. Click on the more link below…

Read more…

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02 May
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African Shipwreck Discovery

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The ship was laden with tons of copper ingots, elephant tusks, gold coins — and cannons to fend off pirates. But it had nothing to protect it from the fierce weather off a particularly bleak stretch of inhospitable African coast, and it sank 500 years ago. Now it has been found, stumbled upon by De Beers geologists prospecting for diamonds off Namibia.

Read the whole article at Discovery News.

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