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Archive for June, 2008

30 June
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Native Americans of Maryland

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In this detailed article by History of American Women blog we learn more about the first Marylanders, Algonquian languages, Nanticokes, the Piscataway/ Conoy and other tribes…

The first Marylanders were Paleo-Indians who came more than 10,000 years ago from other parts of North America to hunt mammoth, great bison, and caribou. By 1000 B.C., Maryland had more than 8,000 Native Americans in about 40 different tribes. Most of them spoke Algonquian languages. They grew corn, peas, squash and tobacco. They also hunted, fished and traded with tribes as far away as New York and Ohio.

Click on the link above to read the whole article.

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29 June
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HP114 – Superman

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Thank you Drew M. from Orlando, Florida for this request.

Random Superman facts:

According to an interview with Joe Shuster shortly before his death, the name “Clark Kent” was chosen as a combination of the names of two movie stars, Clark Gable and Kent Taylor

In the words of Warner Bros. President Alan F. Horn, “I thought Superman Returns (2006) was a very successful movie, but I think it should have done $500 million worldwide. We should have had perhaps a little more action to satisfy the young male crowd.” $175 million is the maximum budget the studio is aiming for Superman: Man of Steel. from IMDB.

I originally missed this email when researching for this podcast but Stephanie S. sent me a great link to a little video.

Episode Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Superman

The encyclopedia of superheroes on film and television
Muir, John Kenneth, 1969- REF 791.43652 MUIR J

Additional Links:

Watch a public domain Superman cartoon here.

History of the “S” symbol: http://www.metropolisplus.com/Superman/

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~UG02/superman/history.html

http://www.vex.net/~dq711/superman.htm

Superman beware, kryptonite is real:
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/about-us/news/2007/april/news_11392.html

Superman at fifty : the persistence of a legend
Engle, Gary D., 1947- 741.50973

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27 June
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Witches in History: Mary Ayer Parker

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Great article found today on History of American Women.

Mary was accused of witchcraft, but refused to confess during the witchcraft trials saying, “I know nothing of it, there is another woman of the same name in Andover.”

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26 June
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Women of History: Maria Comnena

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Considered the Queen of Jerusalem…

Maria was the grandniece of the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Comnenus of Constantinople (d.1180).   Maria only gave birth to daughters – one died young (prob bc.1171), and Isabella aged 2 on father’s death (1173). Maria was the stepmother of King Baldwin IV (her husband’s son by his first marriage of Agnes of Courtenay).

Find out more about Maria Comnena and other women in history at the Women of History blog.

 

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25 June
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Odysseus’ Bloody Homecoming Dated

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It was on April 16, 1178 B.C. that the great warrior struck with arrows, swords and spears, killing those who sought to replace him, a pair of researchers say in Monday’s online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Read the whole article at Discovery News.

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24 June
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Deadly Wind

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On June 24th, 1975, an Eastern Airlines jet crashes near John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, killing 115 people. The Boeing 727 was brought down by wind shear, a sudden change in wind speed or direction.

This is another great article from Obscure History.

More information about wind shear.

How to avoid wind shear from NASA.

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23 June
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Ancient Egyptian Rope Found in Cave

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The ancient Egyptian’s secret to making the strongest of all rigging ropes lies in a tangle of cord coils in a cave at the Red Sea coast, according to preliminary study results presented at the recent congress of Egyptologists in Rhodes.

Read the whole article at Discovery News.

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20 June
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NYC History: McSorley’s Old Ale House

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The Bowery Boys new episode:

Grab yourself a couple mugs of dark ale and learn about the history of one of New York City’s oldest bars, serving everyone from Abraham Lincoln to John Lennon — and eventually even women!

Check it out at The Bowery Boys

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19 June
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Lizzie Borden

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I thought we would cover a little about Ms. Borden today since on this day in 1893 she was acquitted.  Lizzie Borden…

was a New England spinster who was the central figure in the hatchet murders of her father and stepmother on August 4, 1892 in Fall River, Massachusetts in the United States. The slayings, subsequent trial, and the following trial by media became a cause célèbre. The fame of the incident has endured in American pop culture and criminology. Although Lizzie Borden was acquitted, no one else was ever arrested or tried, and she has remained notorious in American folklore. Dispute over the identity of the killer or killers continues to this day.

This and much more information is available at Wikipeida.  Check it out and learn something today!

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18 June
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History of Weddings

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Found a great post in the blogsphere about the history of weddings.

During the middle ages, we saw the rise of marriage laws. In 1076, The Council of Westminster made it a law that marriage must be blessed by a priest, and in the 16th century it was said that the marriage must be performed by a priest with witnesses present. Contracts and legal documents started to be drawn up, similar to today’s prenuptial agreements, marriage contracts and licenses. Dowry, property, rights, etc… would be contained in these documents.

Check out History Undressed for the rest of this article.

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