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Archive for September, 2008

16 September
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Ten Victims of the Hope Diamond

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in 1792, the Hope Diamond was stolen from the house that stored the crown jewels. It’s a pretty fascinating little bauble, if you’re the sort of person who is impressed by 45.52 carat gems (I am).

Found at mental_floss

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15 September
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Einstein’s Watch for Sale

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It will be auctioned on October 16, just in time for you to count the remaining hours before they find God’s Particle or destroy the Galaxy at CERN.

Found at Gizmodo

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12 September
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WWII Tank Recovered from Lake

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Simply amazing story of a WWII tank pulled from a lake and a ton of ammunition also found in the lake.  Great stuff.  It comes from

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11 September
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The Lost Ship

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“The Lost Ship” is a really great article put together by Joel at Today’s History Lesson.

This day in history marks one of the blackest days in U.S. Naval history.  Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1945, the USS Indianapolis was attacked and sunk in the Philippine Sea by Japanese submarine I-58.  But there were hundreds of ships and subs sunk during the United States’ 4-year involvement in World War II, so it wasn’t the sinking itself.

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10 September
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Prohibition

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A wonderful article about prohibition.  Great detail and great history!

Prohibition: It certainly seemed like a great idea at the time: Just outlaw liquor and, bam!, goodbye social ills of every stripe—from the Germans to the Irish. Yes, pandering to xenophobia was the favorite tactic among Prohibition crusaders, who painted saloons as a filthy underworld brimming with undesirable foreigners. Ultimately, however, the event that probably did the most to push America toward Prohibition was the country’s 1917 entry into World War I. Prohibitionists began arguing that all of America’s resources were needed to fight the German menace, using the logic that, if the government needed to maximize agricultural production to win the war, then it couldn’t waste all that grain on booze. Apparently, their message worked. By the end of 1917, the majority of Americans were living in alcohol-free states or counties.

Read more at mental_floss.

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09 September
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Sarah Kemble Knight

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Another great biography from MaggieMac at History of American Women

Sarah Kemble, born on April 19, 1666, daughter of a merchant who had settled in Charlestown, Massachusetts, in the 1630s. Sometime before 1689, Sarah married Richard Knight, who was probably a sea captain and was often away from home. Sarah and Richard lived in a large house on Moon Street in Boston, and she ran a writing school.

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08 September
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History of KFC

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Hot fresh goodness from History of Business blog…

In 1939 Colonel Harland Sanders perfected the secret blend of 11 herbs and spices of fried chicken. Colonel Sanders was born on September 9, 1890. He masters range of regional dishes by age of seven.

Click the link above for more about the history of KFC.

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05 September
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Train Heist

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I love Obscure History

On August 8th, 1963, a gang of 15 men rob a Royal Mail train carrying about $7 million from Glasgow to London. The super-secret train had already picked up mail and cash from banks in Scotland and northern England by the time the thieves sprang into action near Cheddington. However, their getaway plan was not as meticulous as they thought, and most of the gang members were eventually caught.

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04 September
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The History of American Express

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Another article about business histories from History of Business blog…

Established in 1850 in New York, American Express Company was among the first and most successful express delivery businesses to arise during the rapid westward expansion of the United States. The U.S. Postal Service at the time was slow, expensive and nonexistent in many areas. Nothing larger than a letter-sized envelope could be sent by mail, and certainly nothing valuable, as a fair number of deliveries were lost or stolen en route.

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03 September
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HP115 – Diabetes

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This episode is a request from possibly our youngest listener. Eric who is 10 years old.  Eric has diabetes type one and wants to know more about the history of diabetes especially type one.

Sources:
The History of Diabetes, http://www.diabetes.ca/Section_About/timeline.asp
Diabetes History, http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-history.html
Wikipedia: Diabetes mellitus, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes

Not a source but a useful site: http://www.diabeticdays.com/

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