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Archive for October, 2008

31 October
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11 of the Best and Worst Rated Historic Sites

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Found on Digg, originally from National Geographic.  Click on the National Geographic link for great photos and articles form the 11 best and worst historic sites.

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30 October
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Japanese detainees in America, 1942

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Check out the picture at World History Journal.

Members of the Mochida family awaiting evacuation bus. Identification tags were used to aid in keeping a family unit intact during all phases of evacuation. Mochida operated a nursery and five greenhouses on a two-acre site in Eden Township.” In 1942 Executive Order 9066 ordered the removal of 110,000 civilians of Japanese descent, including 71,000 American citizens, from the western United States, placing them in internment camps.

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29 October
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History of Nokia

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From History of Business.

Nokia is a Finnish company that since 1995 has become a global leader in the production of cellular phone.  Traditional images of Finnish industry are associated with timber forest products, furniture, ships and Valco (a government television picture tube company). The importance of the forest industry was evident in the slogan Nokia used during 70s, “Finland lives from its forest”.

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28 October
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Historic steamboat may be on last cruise

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From CNN.

The great paddlewheel turned the Ohio River water to a froth as the Delta Queen steamboat, a floating National Historic Landmark, departed Cincinnati, Ohio, on its final scheduled voyage this week.

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27 October
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7 Close Calls in the Nuclear Age

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From mental_floss

Here’s a formula for fun: Arm two superpowers to the teeth with thousands of nuclear warheads. Make sure they are deeply hostile and suspicious of each other. Now, cut off diplomatic communication, stir in about 50 smaller countries with their own agendas on each side, and—voilà!—you’ve got yourself a cold war!

Read about these seven close calls:

  1. Suez Crisis
  2. SAC-NORAD Communication Failure
  3. U2 Spy Plane Accidentally Violates Soviet Airspace (also mentioned in history podcast episode 1)
  4. When Camping, Make Sure to Hide Your Nuclear Weapons
  5. A Terrifying Crash
  6. Comp Fear
  7. Comp Fear, Part 2
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24 October
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Roanoke Colony

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I know it is not August 18th anymore, but I love stuff on America’s first settlers.

John White, the governor of the Roanoke Island colony in present day North Carolina, returns from a supply trip to England to find the settlement deserted. White and his men found no trace of the 100 or so colonists he left behind, and there was no sign of violence. Among the missing were Ellinor Dare, White’s daughter; and Virginia Dare, White’s granddaughter and the first English child born in America. August 18 was to have been Virginia’s third birthday. The only clue to their mysterious disappearance was the word CROATOAN carved into the palisade that had been built around the settlement. White took the letters to mean that the colonists had moved to Croatoan Island, some 50 miles away, but a later search of the island found none of the settlers.

Found on .

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23 October
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Women who won the Nobel Prize

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As mentioned earlier this week.  Women’s history is important to me, so when I saw this on Digg, I knew it would make a great post.

The Nobel Prize has been awarded to 34 women since 1901. One woman, Marie Curie, has been awarded the Nobel Prize two times, in 1903 (the Nobel Prize in Physics) and in 1911 (the Nobel Prize in Chemistry).

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22 October
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Treasure!

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a pure gold 7th c. cross of Anglo-Saxon manufacture and it was found in a muddy field by yet another British dude with a metal detector.

Check out the amazing pictures of treasure found by ordinary people on The History Blog.

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21 October
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Library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum

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The unique library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, buried beneath lava by Vesuvius’s eruption in AD79, is slowly revealing its long-held secrets. A cluster of the villa’s papyrus scrolls, in much the same state as they were found 250 years ago, lies in a display case in the Biblioteca Nazionale’s Herculaneum reading room. The individual scrolls, which extend in some cases to 9m unrolled, look not unlike charcoaled arboreal limbs left at the bottom of a campfire. A group of six rolls, compacted by the weight of volcanic debris, has emulsified into one unsightly pile.

Found on LISNews – Librarian And Information Science News

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20 October
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Molly Welsh Banneker

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This is from Hisotry of American Women.  I like to cover as much as possible about women’s role in history since it is often overlooked.  As is the role slavery played, making this a great article.

In England, during the 17th century, people who were convicted of crimes were sometimes shipped to the American colonies to work on plantations. In 1683, Molly Welsh, an English dairy maid, was found guilty of stealing milk from a farmer. In fact, she had accidentally knocked over a pail of milk, but the mistake was costly. Molly was indentured to a Maryland tobacco farmer to pay for her crime.

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