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Archive for January, 2009

21 January
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Vice Presidents

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All you always wanted to know about the “other guy”.  Found on Boing Boing.

Holy cow, did I ever enjoy reading Veeps: Profiles in Insignificance by Bill Kelter and Wayne Shellabarger, a snarky, thorough look at the foibles and missteps of the vice presidency from John Adams to Dick Cheney. I had no idea how completely comic the office has been through the years, but, as the authors note: “[The Vice Presidents’] relentless and overwhelming facelessness is testament to the bewildering fact that for more than 200 years, the American people have elected a buffoon’s gallery of rogues, incompetents, empty suits, abysmal spellers, degenerate golfers and corrupt Marylanders to the Vice Presidency with barely a passing consideration that they might one day have to assume the highest office in the land.”

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20 January
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19 January
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China Finds Major Dinosaur Site

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Chinese researchers have unearthed what they believe is the largest collection of dinosaur bones ever found.

Read the whole article at BBC.

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18 January
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Cliopatria Awards Announced!

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Found on History News Network.

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17 January
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America’s First Spy?

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Patience Lovell…

Patience fell from royal favor because of her open support for the American Colonies. During the Revolutionary War, she opened her London home to American prisoners of war and corresponded frequently with Benjamin Franklin. It is believed that she hid secret messages in the wax sculptures that she sent to her sister, who was running a wax museum in Philadelphia.

Found on History of American Women.

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16 January
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A Stonehenge in Lake Michigan?

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A year and a half ago, a professor of underwater archeology at Northwestern Michigan Universitydiscovered a pattern of stones 40 feet below the waters of Lake Michigan. The story has been surprisingly under-reported, given that the Stonehenge-like structure is potentially estimated to be 10,000 years old. One of the stones even appears to have a mastodon carved on it

Found on Metafilter.

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15 January
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Another History Related Podcast: ROME!

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The History of Rome podcast look fairly new.  I haven’t tried it out yet, but I am adding to to my podcast now.  What are your thoughts?  Found via metafilter.

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14 January
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Sally Cary Fairfax

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young George Washington, Lawrence’s half-brother, began to visit Belvoir frequently. 

Washington’s girlfriend?

Found via History of American Women.

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13 January
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Surprisingly late Roman battlefield found in Germany

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After Rome lost 3 legions to Germanic tribes united under Ariminius, aka Hermann, in the 9 A.D. Battle of Teutoborg forest, Augustus ordered that troops withdraw to the Rhine, and there the border stayed pretty much without exception until the empire crumbled.

via The History Blog.

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12 January
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How Was Australia Populated?

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It’s one of anthropology’s most enduring and controversial mysteries – no one is quite certain just how or when the indigenous peoples of Australia (also known as “aboriginals”) arrived. As recently as the turn of the last century, it was believed that they had been on the continent no longer than 400 years or so. That eventually gave way to the notion that Aboriginals had been in Australia since about 8,000 years ago. Then in the 60s, a geologist named Jim Bowler uncovered the skeleton of a woman on the banks of a long-dried lake bed, who had died some 23,000 years ago. Nowadays, experts put the date of arrival from anywhere between 45,000 and 60,000 years ago.

From mental_floss.

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