Amazon.com Widgets

History on Air

History Podcast and Blog Subscribe via iTunes Podcast RSS Feed Subscribe via Stitcher Blog RSS Feed Follow us on Twitter Friend us on Facebook Watch Us on YouTube

Archive for January, 2009

11 January
0Comments

The Legend of Robin Hood

Share

The first references to Robin Hood were not told in romantic or even bawdy ballads. They weren’t written in stories or records of the affluent or the poor. No, a mere mention here and there in various rolls of the English Justices across England. The name was spelled differently, often seen as Robinhood, Robehod, Hobbehod or Rabunhod. The name started to pop up in the 13th century. But it wasn’t in reference to one person. In actuality, it appeared that our dear Robin was just another name for crook and criminal. But who’s to say that they didn’t start calling all thieves of the nobles Robin’s after the hero in our imaginations, started to truly do his deeds?

Great article up at History Undressed about Robin Hood.  Check this one out!

Share
10 January
0Comments

The Story of Orange County, California

Share

This is where I currently live so I’m very interested in watching these.  I hope I get some time soon to watch them!

I recently discovered that KOCE-TV has posted The Story of Orange County on YouTube. This series was created for the County’s centennial in 1989, and features an interesting mix of historians and other experts. 

Great post by O.C. History Roundup.

Share
09 January
0Comments

“Bizarre” New Dinosaur: Giant Raptor Found in Argentina

Share

An “unexpected,” 20-foot-long new dinosaur has been discovered in South America, rewriting the evolutionary history of raptors, a new study says.

Read the whole article at National Geographic News.

Share
08 January
0Comments

‘Ancient city unearthed’ in Peru

Share

Researchers in Peru say they have discovered the ruins of an entire city – possibly the “missing link” between ancient cultures.

Read the whole article at the BBC.

Share
07 January
0Comments

Sarah Franklin Bache: Daughter of Benjamin Franklin

Share

Sarah Franklin was born to Benjamin Franklin and Deborah Read Franklin at Philadelphia on the eleventh day of September, 1744. Sarah, known as Sally throughout her life, had a typical education for a girl of her status in eighteenth-century Philadelphia. She had a great love of reading and music and was considered a skilled harpsichordist.

Great article on one of Ben’s kids.  Read the whole thing at History of American Women.  For more on Ben listen to episode 44.

Share
06 January
0Comments

Slavery Worse Than Ever

Share

This is a very disturbing yet fascinating article.

There are more slaves in the world today than at any time in human history. Buying a slave in Haiti takes just a few minutes and is only a short plane ride away.

Whole article at Foreign Policy.  Found via kotke.org.

Share
05 January
0Comments

Gladiators return to Colosseum after 2,000 years

Share

Umberto Broccoli, the head of archaeology at Rome city council, said it was time that the five million people who visited the Colosseum annually saw the kind of shows originally staged there. They should also experience “the sights, sounds and smells” of Ancient Rome.  Mauro Cutrufo, the deputy mayor, said that a series of events would be held next year to mark the two thousandth anniversary of the birth of the Emperor Vespasian, who began the construction of the Colosseum.

Read the whole story at Times Online.  Found via You’re History.

Share
01 January
0Comments

Great Quote

Share

Malick’s version, of course, is considerably better than the historical fraud perpetuated by the Disney production of Pocahontas in 1995.” – Ron Briley, HNN

Share