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Archive for February, 2009

08 February
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Art History

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From Flickr User silent stereo

 

From Flickr User silent stereo

 

Found this great link at kottke.org

smarthistory is a fantastic substitute for that art history class you never took in college.  [From smarthistory:]  smARThistory.org is a free multi-media web-book designed as a dynamic enhancement (or even substitute) for the traditional and static art history textbook.  This looks like a great resource.

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07 February
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Profile of Tea Party Historian

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From Flickr user jorgeq From Flickr user jorgeq

This month the Tufts Journal ran an article on the university’s early American historian Benjamin Carp (also one of the earliest and most supportive readers of Boston 1775). Ben’s working on a book about theBoston Tea Party.

Read the whole article at Boston 1775.

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06 February
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1,800 year old marble head discovered

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From Flickr user mharrsch

From Flickr user mharrsch

Archaeologists in Israel have discovered what they believe is the bust of a Roman boxer from the second or third century

Read the whole story at CNN.

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05 February
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Auschwitz in need of renovation

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From Flickr user confusedvision

From Flickr user confusedvision

[January 27th was] International Holocaust Memorial Day, the 63rd anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz death camp by the Soviet army, and the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum is in desperate need of renovation.  The museum doesn’t have anything like the 120 million dollars needed to restore the rickety barracks and cracked cell walls.

Read the whole story at The History Blog.

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04 February
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Spies in the American Revolution

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From Flickr user boskizzi

From Flickr user boskizzi

 

During the Revolutionary War, women applied the traditional skills they learned as homemakers to espionage work. Both the British and American armies recruited housewives and young girls as cooks and maids. With their almost unrestricted access to soldiers’ campsites, these women could eavesdrop on conversations about troop movements, leadership changes, and equipment shortages and deliveries without raising suspicion. Often at great peril, they secretly provided this critical intelligence data to military and civilian leaders. Some reported directly to General Washington, who came to highly value the information he received from these “agents in place.”

Read the whole article at History of American Women.

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03 February
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8mm Camera Gun

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While most people on the front lines would hope to pack a 9mm or better, one Vietnam reporter carried this deadly-looking Bolex 8mm camera gun that did nothing but shoot film.

As Boing Boing Gadgets points out, even if the rifle components offered the shooter some level of stability amidst the whizzing bullets of a war zone, would you ever want to look like you were aiming a gun at someone if you weren’t really aiming a gun at someone?

You can bid on this Bolex H-8 on eBay now (it’s over $1,000), or you can just get your kicks by just reading about all the vintage Bolex cameras instead. [eBay via bbGadgets]

Found via Gizmodo.

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02 February
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1904 NYC Subway Map

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Awesome picture of the 1904 New York City subway system.  Found via Digg at NYCSubway.org.  Full size image here.

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01 February
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MacKinney Collection of Medieval Medical Illustrations

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A good primary source from medieval times is the MacKinney Collection of Medieval Medical Illustrations. It features Loren Carey MacKinney’s collection of images from medieval medical manuscripts. The site is courtesy of the University of North Carolina.

Found at World History Blog.

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