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Archive for April, 2009

30 April
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Famous Pirate Ships

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Queen Anne’s Revenge

English pirate Edward Teach, more commonly known as Blackbeard, captured the Concorde, a French-owned slave ship, in the West Indies in 1717 and made the vessel his flagship. Slave ships, which often featured a central partition to protect the crew against a slave uprising, made good pirate ships because they were built for speed. Blackbeard added 26 guns to the vessel, which already boasted 14, making the renamed Queen Anne’s Revenge one of the most powerful ships in American waters. In May 1718, Blackbeard blockaded the port of Charleston. After looting five merchant vessels, he ran the Queen Anne’s Revenge ashore on Topsail Inlet, and the ship suffered extensive damage when it slammed into the submerged sandbar. Given that Blackbeard knew the area well – he had sailed off the same coast the year before – many historians believe he wrecked the Queen Anne’s Revenge deliberately in hopes of killing off some of his crew and increasing his share of the fortune. The ship was discovered in 1997 off the coast of Beaufort, North Carolina, and marine archaeologists have been bringing up treasure from its remains ever since.

Read about 5 other famous pirate ships at mental_floss.  Image credit: Serolynne

Book:

The Pirate Ship 1660-1730 (New Vanguard)

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29 April
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Los Angeles Riots [On This Day]

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On this day in 1992 the Los Angeles riots started…

The Los Angeles Riots of 1992, also known as the Rodney King uprising or the Rodney King riots, were sparked on April 291992 when a jury acquitted four Los Angeles Police Department officers accused in the videotaped beating of African-American motorist Rodney King following a high-speed pursuit. Thousands of people in the Los Angeles area rioted over the six days following the verdict. Widespread lootingassaultarson and murder occurred, and property damages topped roughly US$1 billion. Many of the crimes were racially motivated or perpetrated. In all, 53 people died during the riots and thousands more were injured. [Wikipedia]

Image credit: bcmacsac1

Books:
Geography of Rage: Remembering the Los Angeles Riots of 1992
Strange Future: Pessimism and the 1992 Los Angeles Riots
Kjlh-fm and the Los Angeles Riots of 1992: Compton?s Neighborhood Station in the Aftermath of the Rodney King Verdict
Read more…

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28 April
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Swine Flu and Past Epidemics

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I usually stay away from current events as a rule, but I saw this picture and read the following article and couldn’t resist writing something about it.  Is the media over hyping this whole swine flu thing?  This Forbes.com article brings back the discussion about SARS to remind us, that this too shall pass.

But as quickly as it [SARS] came, it just as quickly faded away. The virus turned out not to be as contagious as feared. To date, the World Health Organization estimates that 774 people died from SARS. Most of the deaths occurred in Hong Kong and other areas in Southern China–where officials let the outbreak fester too long without taking steps to contain it. [MSN via Forbes]

And from Wired.com more history…

1976: President Gerald Ford orders a nationwide vaccination program to prevent a swine flu epidemic.

Image credit:  Tim Zim

Learn More:
Twenty-First Century Plague: The Story of SARS
SARS: How a Global Epidemic Was Stopped (A WPRO Publication)
The Swine Flu Affair: Decision-making on a Slippery Disease
The Great Bird Flu Hoax: The Truth They Don’t Want You to Know About the

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27 April
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Franklin: The Lost State of America

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Did you know about Franklin State?  Neither did I.  Check it out.  Books about its history below.

The strange but true story of the State of Franklin, and the events that led to its creation.  It is quite a strange (some might say tall) tale that arose from the ashes of the American Revolutionary War:  In August 1784 delegates from three of the eight western counties of North Carolina met in the town of Jonesborough. There was a vote and on the 23rd of the month they declared the lands independent. The state of Franklin was born.  Opposition was immediate – North Carolina published a manifesto condemining the formation of the new state (see above). In fact it brought about the first political pamphlet war for that part of America. [Neatorama]

Image Credit:   jimmywayne22

About this photo:

Replica of the capitol building for the State of Franklin. Greeneville, TN was the capitol city. The original building was lost while in transport back from the Tennessee Centenniel and International Exposition in Nashville in 1897. Only a single key remains to the original building.  Located across from Greeneville City Hall  The State of Franklin was in existence from 1784-88. It included lands within 8 current TN counties: Blount, Carter, Greene, Hamblen, Hawkins, Jefferson, Johnson, Sevier, Sullivan, Unicoi and Washington. The counties seceded from North Carolina to form the “state” but never really gained much actual power. The counties returned to North Carolina and then to the newly formed State of Tn in 1796.  Historic Marker:
www.flickr.com/photos/auvet/491853073/in/photostream/  State of Franklin link:  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_of_franklin 

Books:


The Lost State of Franklin: America’s First Secession (New Directions in Southern History)

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24 April
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Secret Wars, Her Majesty’s Secret Service: The First 100 Years

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Secret Wars: One Hundred Years of British Intelligence Inside MI5 and MI6 looks like a fascinating book.  It has already been added to my goodreads to-read list!  Can’t wait to read this one.  Discovered the book from reading a great article at NPR.

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23 April
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The Last Titanic Survivor

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At the tender age of 9 weeks, Millvina Dean had a brush with history that altered her life forever. Today, the 97-year-old Dean is the oldest living survivor of the Titanic. [Neatorama]

Image from BBC.  Lots more on the BBC article.

More resources:
The Story of the Titanic As Told by Its Survivors
882 1/2 Amazing Answers To Your Questions About The Titanic
Titanic – The Complete Story History Channel DVD
National Geographic – Secrets of the Titanic DVD

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22 April
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21 April
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Animated Map of Imperial History of the Middle East

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Cool flash animated map that shows the Imperial History of the Middle East.  Link.  Found via Digg.

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20 April
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Pop Quiz, Hot Shot

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Have you been listening?  Want to test your History Podcast knowledge?  Listener Martin has developed questions for several of the podcasts.  Test your history knowledge at: http://www.spenglr.com/groups/3  Image Credit:  COCOEN daily photos

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20 April
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Al Capone’s Prison Cell

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Click for Large Image

Here is a photo of Al Capone’s Prison cell at Eastern State Penitentiary.  Not to bad for a criminal.  Found via Neatorama.  Imaged credit: mikeg626

6 Criminals who lived very, very well

More resources:
Mr. Capone: The Real – and complete – story of Al Capone
Biography – Al Capone: Scarface (A&E DVD Archives)
Capone: The Man and the Era
Capone: The Life and World of Al Capone

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