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Archive for September, 2009

20 September
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Chernobyl 1984-2009: Then and Now

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Found via Digg:

Though people generally speak of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, it was the city of Pripyat that actually housed the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and was founded in 1970 just for this purpose. Before the nuclear disaster on April 26, 1986 that saw the destruction of Reactor No. 4 and the release of huge clouds of radioactive material, the town was home to around 50,000 people. Follow us on a tour that shows the contrast between the radiant city prior to 1986 and the radioactive ghost town in 2009.

Read the whole article and view the pictures at Environmental Graffiti.

Image courtesy of: stuckincustoms

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19 September
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Bomb Shelters

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bomb shelter

Found via Neatorama via Dark Roasted Blend:

Many folks built small bomb shelters to survive a nuclear attack during the Cold War, but others took the idea to great lengths. Good Magazine has a pictorial taken from the book Waiting for the End of the World by Richard Ross, in which you’ll see the interiors of shelters meant to house people waiting out the apocalypse. From Switzerland to Texas, you’ll see how people prepare for the end of the world as we know it. The underground dining room shown is in Sanpete Country, Utah.

Find a ton of cool photos of bomb shelters here.

Image courtesy of: www.good.is

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18 September
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Early music discovered on carving

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Musical Head

Found via BBC News:

A sequence of 0s, Is and IIs have been found on one of the Stirling Heads – wooden medallions which would have decorated the castle’s royal palace. It is believed the music could have been played on instruments such as harps, viols, fiddles and lutes.

Listen to a harpist’s interpretation of the music.

Image coutesy of: BBC News.

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17 September
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WWII: Intense Propaganda Posters

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Great photos to browse through this morning. Found via Boing Boing.

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16 September
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Scottish Mythology

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Enjoy this article on the origins Scottish mythology found on History Undressed:

Scottish mythology is actually quite entwined with the Irish. One such example expounds on how settlers from Greek Asia Minor sailed across the sea to a place they called “the mountain of Ireland”. These settlers warred with Picts, invaded an area known as Britain, conquered the people, and renamed the land ‘Scotia’. When the Gaelic world assimilated the Picts into their fold, some history was lost and subsequently filled-in with myths and folklore. The people of present day Scotland grew from a diversity of cultures and their individual influences.

Read the whole article at History Undressed.

Image courtesy of: redsontour

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15 September
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The Anne Boylen Files

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Found via The World History Blog, The Anne Boylen Files is a website dedicated to the English queen Anne Boleyn.  The site has a lot on it!  Bios, book reviews, events, a forum, even an interview with the site author.  Very cool!

Image courtesy of:  thomwatson

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14 September
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First Lady Fashion Faux Pas

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Found via mental_floss:

Frances Cleveland was much younger than her Presidential husband – 27 years younger, to be exact. So, it makes sense that her fashions were a bit more youthful than a lot of her female White House peers: she wore gowns that showed a lot of skin for the times and loved to show off her bare neck, shoulders and arms. The nation loved Frances and scads of young women copied her scandalously bare look, much to the chagrin of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. They drew up a petition and had copies sent to various branches, then circulated the petitions across the country in an attempt to get Mrs. Cleveland to please think about her position as a role model for young ladies. Their pleas went ignored.

Nine more on to read on mental_floss.

Image courtesy of:  nostri-imago

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13 September
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Llano del Rio

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Found via mental_floss:

Llano del Rio is one of the most distinctive ghost towns in the United States. Like many Utopian communities, it lasted only a short time — a few hopeful, productive years — before being abandoned. Unlike most, however, it was built to last — its granite foundations sourced from nearby mountain ranges — and, still in the middle of nowhere even 90 years after it was inhabited, it’s been allowed to linger on, a monument to the disappeared past on the edge of a vast desert.

Image courtesy of:  frankenspock

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12 September
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Watch History Detectives Online for Free

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The History Blog discovers that you can watch The History Detectives episodes online for free at PBS.org.  I love this show and if you like history you probably will also.  So check it out!

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11 September
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