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Archive for the 'imported from blogger' Category

20 April
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HistoryPodcast 58 – Antoni Gaudí

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Spanish architect who worked mainly in Barcelona, developing a startling new style that paralleled developments in art nouveau. His most celebrated work is the façade of the Expiatory Church of the Holy Family.

HP58 – Antoni Gaudí.mp3 20:20 – 18.7MB
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14 April
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HistoryPodcast 57 – Easter

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Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed between late March and late April (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity) to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, which Christians believe occurred after his death by crucifixion in AD 27-33 (see Good Friday). Easter can also refer to the season of the church year, lasting for fifty days, which follows this holiday and ends at Pentecost. Easter Day is also called the Sunday of the Resurrection.

HP 57 – Easter.mp3 19:00 – 7.79MB

Question: Who introduced todays episode of historypodcast?

Answer: Lauren.

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06 April
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HistoryPodcast 56 – General George Patton

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George Smith Patton, Jr. was a leading U.S. Army general in World War II. In his 36-year Army career, he was an advocate of armored warfare and commanded major units of North Africa, Sicily, and the European Theater of Operations. Many have viewed Patton as a pure and ferocious warrior, known by the nickname “Old Blood and Guts”, a name given to him after a reporter misquoted his statement that it takes blood and brains to win a war. But history has left the image of a brilliant military leader whose record was also marred by insubordination and some periods of apparent instability. He once said, “Lead me, follow me, or get the hell out of my way.”

HP56 – General George Patton.mp3 12:24 – 11.5MB

Question: When did Patton graduate from West Point?

Answer: June, 11, 1909

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02 April
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HistoryPodcast 55 – Wall Street

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Wall Street is the name of a narrow street in lower Manhattan running east from Broadway downhill to the East River. Considered to be the historical heart of the Financial District, it was the first permanent home of the New York Stock Exchange. The phrase “Wall Street” is also used to refer to American financial markets and financial institutions as a whole. Interestingly, most New York financial firms are no longer headquartered on Wall Street, but elsewhere in lower or midtown Manhattan, Greenwich, Connecticut, or New Jersey. JPMorgan Chase, the last major holdout, sold its headquarters tower at 60 Wall Street to Deutsche Bank in November 2001.

HP55 – Wall Street.mp3 16:42 – 15.4MB

Question: What is the first year Michelle mentions as a stock market crash?

Answer: 1929

Links/Sources:

Stock Market Crash of 1987
Stock Market Crash of 1929
Wikipedia article on Stock Market Crash of 1929
Wikiipedia Article
A to Z Investments: 1929 Crash

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica

Books

Left To Tell : Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust

Confessions of a Wall Street Analyst : A True Story of Inside Information and Corruption in the Stock Market

The First Wall Street : Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, and the Birth of American Finance

Wall Street : A History

Wall Street: A History : From Its Beginnings to the Fall of Enron

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24 March
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HistoryPodcast 54 – Charles Stewart Parnell

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Charles Stewart Parnell (June 27, 1846 – October 6, 1891) was an Irish political leader and one of the most important figures in 19th century Ireland and the United Kingdom; William Ewart Gladstone thought him the most remarkable person he had ever met. A future Liberal Prime Minister, Herbert Henry Asquith, described him as one of the three or four greatest men of the nineteenth century, while Lord Haldane described him as the strongest man the British House of Commons had seen in 150 years.

H54 – Charles Stewart Parnell.mp3 15:19 – 14.2MB

Links

Podcast for Good

Wikipedia Article

Clare County Library Also used as source for this podcast

Ireland Information site about Parnell

BBC History of Parnell

Books

James Joyce:
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Penguin Classics)

Ulysses (Vintage International)

Finnegans Wake (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics)

Parnell:
Charles Stewart Parnell;: His love story and political life,

Parnell and Irish nationalism

Charles Stewart Parnell (Compact Irish History)

Bonnie and Clyde:
Ambush: The Real Story of Bonnie and Clyde

Music

Shams – Falling from Grace

The Redline – Beautiful

Meg Allison – Missing Piece

Alex Brooke – Wanna tell you

TV Listings
All Times Pacific

History Channel

Friday 24
10-11pm Caligula: Reign of Madness

Saturday 25
8-9pm Save Our History: Alaska’s Bloodiest Battle
9-11pm Alaska: Big America

Sunday 26
8-9pm Auschwitz: The Forgotten Evidence
9-10pm Standing Tall at Auschwitz

Monday 27
10-11pm Deep Sea Detectives: Great Lakes Ghost Ship

History International Channel

Friday 24
9-10pm Cliff Mummies of the Andes
10-11pm Secret Passages: The Cold War

Monday 27
7:30-8pm History’s Turning Points: 1641 AD: The Marriage of Pocahontas

Discovery Channel

Saturday 25
9pm Mythbusters: Franklin’s Kite

National Geographic Channel

Sunday 26
3-5pm Blackbeard: Terror at Sea

PBS
Monday 27
American Experience: Eugene O’Neill

Listener Email

Hello, I just listened to your podcast. I liked it but there are a few errors. First of all you birth dates wrong. bonnie was born in 1909. Clyde in 1910. 2nd Ted rogers killed bucher in hillsboro Clyde was in the car. Ted rogers looked very much like ray hanillton that’s why he was accused of the killing. 3rd Bonnie was not at that dance with clyde. 4th Bonnie never shot that bar in joplin. 5th Blance did 6 years not 10. her sentence was ten. Henry Methvin did not betray Bonnie and Clyde. Ivy Methvin was taking by the posse ( which included ted Hinton Who wrote the book ambush)and was forced to help the posse. After it was over Hinton and hamer Told Ivy Methvin if he keeps his mouth shut and dosn’t tell the F.B.I. they would drop all the his son had in texas. Ted Hinton Tells this in his book. Why would he lie about that. He said they broke the law to get Bonnie and Clyde Hinton tarnist his carrer by atmiting that. read ambush and Bonnie ans Clyde a twenty first update. I hope you correct there errors. Thanks Dave

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16 March
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HistoryPodcast 53 – Tiananmen Square

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The Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989, also known as the Tiananmen Square Massacre, June 4th Incident, or “Political Turmoil between Spring and Summer of 1989″ by the Chinese government, were a series of student-led demonstrations in the People’s Republic of China which occurred between April 15, 1989 and June 4, 1989. The protest is named after the location of the forceful suppression of the movement in Tian’anmen Square, Beijing by the People’s Liberation Army. The protestors came from disparate groups, ranging from intellectuals who believed the Communist Party-led government was too corrupt and repressive, to urban workers who believed Chinese economic reform had gone too far and that the resulting rampant inflation and widespread unemployment was threatening their livelihoods.

HP53 – Tiananmen Square.mp3 19:07 – 17.6MB

Links

Wikipedia Article

BBC On This Day

A Film on the event

CNN Indepth Special

Amnesty International

Lots of Pictures

Time Article on the Unknown Rebel (the man who faced the tanks)

Remembering Tiananmen Square

Books

Voices from Tiananmen Square : Beijing Spring and the Democracy Movement

The Tiananmen Papers : The Chinese Leadership’s Decision to Use Force Against Their Own People – In Their Own Words

I’m reading: Tiananmen Square

Music

Rising Sun – (The End of Days Trilogy) Day 1 Beginning

Torchomatic – Raining Colours

Martin Herzberg – Walk for Change

Tems – Afterthought (Tems with Chinafly)

Shams – Falling from Grace

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09 March
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HistoryPodcast 52 – History of St. Patrick’s Day

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Saint Patrick’s Day (March 17), is the Irish feast day which celebrates Saint Patrick (386-493), the patron saint of Ireland. It is a legal holiday in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, the overseas territory of Montserrat and the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It is celebrated worldwide by the Irish and increasingly by many of non-Irish descent. A major parade takes place in Dublin and in most other Irish towns and villages. The five largest parades of recent years have been held in Dublin, New York City, Manchester, Montreal, and Boston. Parades also take place in other places, including London, Paris, Rome, Munich, Moscow, Beijing, Hong Kong, Singapore, Copenhagen and throughout the Americas.

HP52 – Saint Patricks Day.mp3 11:33 – 10.7MB

Links:

St-Patricks-Day.com

Wilstar.com

stpatricksday.ie

HistoryChannel.com

The Music

Brobdingnagian Bards

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02 March
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HistoryPodcast 51 – Today in History

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1807 Congress abolishes the African slave trade
1925 First numbered highways
1949 Automatic streetlights are introduced
1969 Soviet Union and Chinese armed forces clash
1929 Congress passes the Jones Act
1944 Train passengers suffocate
1944 First televised Academy Awards

HP51 – Today in History

Links:

Matt’s Today in History

Lifespring! Podcast

Altlantic Slave Trade Timeline

US Highways Sign History

CNN Cold War Spotlight

Alcohol Prohibition Was A Failure

1944 Academy Awards

Books:

Prohibition : Thirteen Years That Changed America

The Cold War : A New History

75 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards

The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas

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23 February
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HistoryPodcast 50 – Hockey

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Ice hockey, referred to simply as “hockey” in Canada and the United States, is a team sport played on ice. It is one of the world’s fastest sports, with players on skates capable of going high speeds on natural or artificial ice surfaces. The most prominent ice hockey nations are Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Sweden, Slovakia, and the United States. While there are 64 total members of the International Ice Hockey Federation, those seven nations have traditionally dominated the field for decades. Of the sixty medals awarded in men’s competition at the Olympic level between 1920 and 2002, only six did not go to one of those countries (or a former entity thereof, such as Czechoslovakia or the Soviet Union) and only one such medal was awarded above bronze.

HistoryPodcast 50 – Hockey 6:37 – 6.23MB

Links:

Wikipedia Hockey

NHL (National Hockey League)

USA Hockey

The Science of Hockey

Hockey Hall of Fame

Hockey Statistics Database

Hockey News

Books

Hockey for Dummies

The Boys of Winter : The Untold Story of a Coach, a Dream, and the 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey Team

The Greatest Hockey Stories Ever Told : The Finest Writers on Ice (Greatest)

Hockey Tough

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16 February
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HIstoryPodcast 49 – Olympics

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Thank you for listening to another historypodcast. I hope you enjoy this one. It seemed appropriate for this month.

HP49 – Olympics.mp3 4:34 – 4.37MB

Links:

The Official Website of the Olympic Movement

The Worst of the Modern Olympics Was Held … ?
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