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05 December
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Flight 19 and the Bermuda Triangle

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Flight 19 Plan - Wikipedia

Flight 19 Plan – Wikipedia

Flight 19 consisted of five TBM Avenger Torpedo Bombers departed the US Naval Air Station in Fort Lauderdale FL at about 2:10 pm on December 5, 1945. They were on an authorized overwater navigational training flight. All pilots had between 350 and 400 hours of flight time, and at least 55 of those hours were in this type of aircraft. There were scattered showers on their flight path. Weather conditions were considered average for the training flights. At 4pm the first message came across that they might be lost. The flight instructor indicated that he was uncertain of the direction of the Florida coast. He also indicated there their compass was malfunctioning.

Discovery of Flight 19 from project 19 on Vimeo.

The base tried to contact the planes but the signal was too weak. All radio contact was lost before they could figure out exactly what had gone wrong. The flight was never heard from again and no one has ever found the planes. It’s assumed that they made sea landings somewhere off the eastern coast of Florida. We do know that their gas would have been gone by 8pm. They searched for the planes until December 10, 1945.

leader calls the tower, his voice trembling and bordering on hysteria.

“We can’t tell where we are . . .everything is . . .can’t make out anything. We think we may be about 225 miles northeast of base . . .” For a few moments the pilot rambles incoherently before uttering the last words ever heard from Flight 19: “It looks like we are entering white water . . .We’re completely lost.” –US Navy

Official Accident Reports:
http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq15-1_accidentreports.htm

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