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01 December
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The Chunnel Breakthrough

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The Channel Tunnel (“Chunnel” or “Eurotunnel”) is one of the biggest engineering projects ever undertaken in the UK. Taking more than five years to complete, with more than 13,000 workers from England and France collaborating to realize the vision, the tunnel has been named one of the seven wonders of the modern world.  According to Structurae, the cost of the Chunnel was French Franc 45,000,000,000.  The tunnel is 31.4 miles.  The two points it connects are Folkestone, Kent, in the United Kingdom with Coquelles, Pas-de-Calais, near Calais in northern France.  The train flies along at 99 miles an hour.  The first ideas for a “chunnel” were in 1802, but it was until 1988 that contstruction on the modern chunnel started and it wasn’t officially opened until 1994.

At 37.9 kilometres (23.5 mi), the tunnel has the longest undersea portion of any tunnel in the world, although the Seikan Tunnel in Japan is both longer overall at 53.85 kilometres (33.46 mi) and deeper at 240 metres (790 ft) below sea level. -Wikipedia

Today thousands of passengers take the Chunnel every year. Happy 23rd birthday Chunnel!

How the Channel Tunnel was Built

How the Channel Tunnel was Built

Sources:

Video:

Below are all the parts of a discovery show on the construction of the Chunnel:

Part 1:

Much more after the break Read more…

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02 May
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30 Years War Timeline

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This is my first time attaching a PDF in wordpress, so lets hope it works.  This is the last bit of information on the thirty years war.  I think we have covered this topic pretty well.  I’m thinking about the next podcast already.  Hopefully, I will be able to one again soon.

Thirty Years War Timeline PDF

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08 March
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The VW Bus Goes Into Production

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On this day in 1950 the VW Bus went into production.  The official name of the VW Bus or Camper is actually the Transporter.  I think this is a fun topic and one that is best illustrated with a timeline.  So please see the embedded youtube video from my new youtube channel.

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09 February
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The Congress of Vienna

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This is a request from Colin F. way back in October 2005. Colin asked, “…I was wondering if you had done anything on the Vienna Conference of 1815…”. So here you go Colin. First, see the timeline below, which will hopefully help you align all the events.

The congress was held to agree on a plan for Europe politically and territorially. This was done to prevent any one group from obtaining too much power, or what you could today call a monopoly. This group of people had a very altruistic attitude. The leader of the talks was an Austrian named Metternich. Their goal was to create a balance of power in order to prevent widespread conflict in the future.

The conference worked, because even though they were all there for themselves and were greedy, they were forced to concede and come to a compromise by the other members of the congress, no one person willing to give up too much. For Example, Alexander I of Russia wanted all of Poland and Prussia wanted Saxony, but Russia had to share Poland with Austria and Prussia. Only half of Saxony went to Prussia and some smaller parts of the Rhineland.

After much deliberation they came to a final settlement. In the end, the conference helped Europe has a whole, while creating a balance of power. It was the first group of international members gathered to discuss and handle European affairs. In doing so, they protected themselves from being overthrown when one member became too powerful.

Text source: http://www.cusd.chico.k12.ca.us/~bsilva/projects/congress/fogelvin.htm

The below is the best video I could find on the Internet.  The speaker goes over everything really well.  Some of the commenters were kind of mean so if you have time give her some props she deserves it!

Learn more with these books:

The Congress of Vienna: A Study in Allied Unity: 1812-1822 Vienna, 1814: How the Conquerors of Napoleon Made Love, War, and Peace at the Congress of Vienna Rites of Peace: The Fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna
The Congress of Vienna: A Study in Allied Unity: 1812-1822 Vienna, 1814: How the Conquerors of Napoleon Made Love, War, and Peace at the Congress of Vienna Rites of Peace: The Fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna
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